When you craft your thesis statement it should: (1) relate back directly to and clearly answer your final, refined research question (from lra 2), and (2) demonstrate that your historical argument is based on a study of the history of your topic.

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Instructions:
In LRA3, you will continue to search for topic-relevant sources to investigate the historical roots of your contemporary issue, but this time you will locate a primary source created before 1980. In addition, you will compile your sources in an annotated bibliography.
Unsure what LRA 3 should look like? Take a look at this Sample LRA 3Download Sample LRA 3.
Question 1: Finding Primary Sources
While historians use secondary sources to learn about topics and ask new questions, they also use and interpret primary source material. Primary sources are original, first-hand accounts of an event or period of time created by people either during, or close to that time. They can be published, or unpublished and may be available in a variety of formats, such as texts (letters, diaries, government reports, newspaper accounts, autobiographies), images (photographs, paintings, advertisements, posters), artifacts (buildings, clothing, sculpture, coins) and audio/visual (songs, oral history interviews, documentaries).
Although there are many kinds of primary sources, newspapers and magazine articles produced during the historical period in question can be quite useful. They not only report on events, but offer a window into how people interpreted or discussed the event at the time. While we hope that primary sources are free of bias, prejudice, etc., they seldom are. Indeed, that can make them all the more interesting.
WSU Libraries has a number of databases to help you find historical, full-text primary source newspapers. To begin, go to Historical/Older NewspapersLinks to an external site. and select a database. Each database is different, so you’ll have to familiarize yourself with how to search. The Times of LondonLinks to an external site.and the Historical New York TimesLinks to an external site. will likely be the most helpful.
Note that you are not limited to newspapers for your primary source! Diaries, letters, and speeches, are also options. You are also welcome to use audio/visual materials (historical footage, interviews, maps, photographs, and paintings) as primary sources, though you may only use them in addition to written or audio/visual primary sources for this assignment (talk to me if you would like to use those types of sources).
For database tutorials and links to various primary source collections, see the RCI LRA3 Libguide, Finding Primary Sources OnlineLinks to an external site..
TIP: Keep in mind that when searching for older material, words have changed. For example, if your topic is early nuclear bomb development, you are not going to find much on “nuclear bombs” from the 1940s and 1950s. However, you’ll find information on “atomic bombs,” because this was the more common descriptor of the time. Likewise, you may need to broaden the scope of your topic. For example, if you’re researching intellectual property on the Internet, you’re going to have to think about intellectual property law in the pre-Internet era. The point here is to be flexible with your search terms, and if one database does not yield fruitful results, try another one. Research is a trial and error process.
Using Purdue OWL Help GuideLinks to an external site. and/or Chicago Style Help GuideLinks to an external site. (notes/bibliography format), enter the full bibliographic Chicago citation for your pre-1980 primary source.
NOTE: Your citation will depend on what type of source you found. For example, if it is a book, then you would use the appropriate bibliographic citation for books. If you’re accessing your primary source online (and not in print), the citation should include a URL or name of the database where the material was retrieved (see the Chicago-style reference page).
Question 2: Creating an Annotated Bibliography
You have now collected 5 sources related to your topic: two scholarly books (LRA 2), two scholarly journal articles (LRA 2) and one primary source (here in LRA 3).
An annotated bibliography brings together your sources and provides information on each of them. It can help you see what materials you have, how you may use them and how they fit together, and whether there may be more information you need.
For Question 2, create an annotated bibliography with an entry for EACH of your sources including the following information:
The bibliographic (not footnote) Chicago citation for the source, and…
In paragraphs of no less than eight sentences, provide summaries of the main points relevant to your research question addressed in each source, and an explanation of how the source will aid you in answering your research question.
The entries should be in alphabetical order by the authors’ last names (if any of your items do not have an author, use the title of the item to determine alphabetical order).
Question 3: Research Question to Hypothesis / Thesis Statement
As historians learn more information and analyze their sources, they begin to find answers to their research questions, and formulate their argument, or thesis. In essence, a thesis statement is an answer to your research question. When you craft your thesis statement it should: (1) relate back directly to and clearly answer your final, refined research question (from LRA 2), and (2) demonstrate that your historical argument is based on a study of the history of your topic.
For information on how to write a thesis and key examples, refer to the “Making an Argument and Writing a Thesis” guide.
Please copy and paste or type your refined research question from LRA2 into your Word doc (if you changed your topic, be sure to clearly explain). Next, in light of your sources and comments from your instructor provided in LRA1 and LRA2, write an initial hypothesis/thesis statement.
Once you are finished, upload your completed Word document for LRA 3.
The refined questions are Why did the United Fruit Company feel threatened by the Arbenz government and what role it play in the coup?
The comments were: Overall, it looks like you found some sources to work with. However, I recommend using at least one book at focuses on either the history of Guatemala or on the role of the United Fruit Co. in the region. The articles you found, too, can be more focused on Guatemala, rather than the Cold War in general. Good research question. The reflection could have been more detailed.
The sources I use for LRA 3:
Primary Source:”SAN SALVADOR AND GUATEMALA: REPLY FROM GUATEMALA.” New York Times (1923-), May 22, 1938. https://www.proquest.com/historical-newspapers/san-salvador-guatemala/docview/102616749/se-2.
“Guatemala AT A GLANCE.” New York Times (1923-), Mar 24, 1982. https://www.proquest.com/historical-newspapers/guatemala-at-glance/docview/121868434/se-2.
Siobhán Lloyd. “Guatemala.” Socialist Lawyer, no. 64 (2013): 38–40. https://doi.org/10.13169/socialistlawyer.64.0038.
Gaddis, John Lewis. “International Relations Theory and the End of the Cold War.” International Security 17, no. 3 (1992): 5–58. https://doi.org/10.2307/2539129.
Schlesinger, Arthur. “Origins of the Cold War.” Foreign Affairs 46, no. 1 (1967): 22–52. https://doi.org/10.2307/20039280.

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